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Monster Canada’s State of the Candidate Survey Highlights

Monster Canada’s State of the Candidate Survey Highlights

Monster launched its annual State of The Candidate Survey to get a pulse on candidate feelings about the workplace and the future state of the job market. For the first time, Monster fielded surveys in eight global markets; the following report is of the Canadian-specific data. Here’s what the survey revealed: candidates want more from their jobs.  

From salary to mental health to workplace equality and inclusiveness, employers are failing to meet candidate expectations and needs. 

Looking Ahead: The 2020 Candidate Outlook 

Candidates may be on the move in 2020

Two in five (43%) candidates are likely to look for a new job in 2020, most (48%) of whom say they would look within the first six months of 2020. Among those who are likely to look for a new job in 2020, 75% are looking for a full-time position.

The State of the Economy and its Impact on the Candidate

Candidates generally feel secure, but a looming recession could threaten that security. 

Four in five candidates (86%) feel secure in their current position. However, the current state of the economy causes some candidates to worry, resulting in a decreased sense of security compared to those who are not worried (83% vs 95%). 

Over two thirds (71%) of candidates are concerned by the current state of the economy and say the top two threats to their current job is a recession/state of the economy (23%) and layoffs (21%).

One in three (38%) believe their job would be at stake if Canada were to experience a recession, and another one in four (23%) don’t know if their job would be at stake, signalling uncertainty around the effects of a potential recession. 

Candidates prioritize salary when looking for a new job, those staying put are looking for an increase and new skills 

According to candidates, the top three reasons they started their last job search was due to higher salary (34%), benefits (21%), and flexibility/lifestyle (21%). 

When considering a job offer, candidates say salary (70%) is the most important consideration, followed by company perks/benefits (39%), time off/vacation days (38%), flexible work hours (36%), and retirement benefits (32%).

The top two things they hope to achieve at their current job in 2020 include getting a raise (63%) and learning new skills (41%).

Salary Expectations and Negotiation                                                                                      

While most think they are paid fairly (Three in five candidates, 62%), more than one in three (35%) say otherwise. The second group’s answer leads some to take on second jobs to fill the gap. 

Candidates planning to search for a new job in 2020 are more likely to say they are unfairly paid (50%), compared to 71% planning to stay. Two-fifths say they’ve had to take a part-time job to fill the gap between their salary and what’s they need.

According to candidates, the top three things they consider part of their salary include: 

  • Time/days off: 54%
  • Healthcare coverage: 52%
  • Retirement benefits: 41%
  • Bonuses: 35%
  • Commission: 10%†
  • Other: 3%†
  • None of the above: 18%†

 

Stretching the truth to get the job and salary 

One in five (20%) candidates have stretched the truth on their resume/cover letter. Another one in 10 (12%)† say they have provided false references to a recruiter. As well as, one in 10 (15%)† say they exaggerate their previous salary to get more money. 

Salary negotiations, and the gender pay gaps

Males candidates (69%) are more comfortable negotiating their salary at their current job than females counterparts (57%). While most (57%) don’t believe there is a gender pay gap at their company, more than one-quarter (27%) say otherwise. 

Candidates are more likely than to feel comfortable negotiating their salary at their current job when their job affects their mental health positively (71% vs 63%).

Despite most feeling that employers have the upper hand when it comes to salary negotiation (62%), two-thirds (69%) feel comfortable negotiating their salary when accepting a new job. However, candidates have a slightly harder time negotiating their salary at their current jobs, with only 63% saying they feel comfortable.

Ultimately candidates are willing to walk away from an offer if the salary is too low. More than half (53%) saying they’ve turned down a job for this reason. 

Two-thirds (69%) of candidates feel comfortable negotiating their salary when accepting a new job. 

However, candidates have a harder time negotiating their salary at their current jobs, with only 63% saying they feel comfortable negotiating their salary at their current position. 

Mental Health in the Workplace 

Overall candidates say their job positively impacts their mental health. For the more than one-third that say it’s negative, it’s a result of heavy workload and stresses about debts. 

More than one in three (36%) candidates say their job negatively impacts their mental health. As a result, 46% describe an increase in anxiety, and 24% depression.

Many candidates aren’t seeking help, perhaps due to a lack of resources. Over half (53%) of Canadians who experience mental health-related issues have not sought help, and nearly two out of five (39%) report their employer does not offer any mental health or wellness support/benefits.