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Tips for Creating Slogans and Taglines

Tips for Creating Slogans and Taglines

By Mark Swartz

 

Do you know the difference between slogans and taglines? You should if marketing is part of your mandate. These two tools are foundational in popularizing your brand and positioning promotional campaigns.

Creativity is needed when creating slogans and taglines for a small business. Standing out from the crowd, and capturing the essence of your offerings, makes for enduring mottos.

 

Differences Between A Slogan And Tagline

Slogans and taglines are often thought to be the same thing. However while they’re both used in advertising, they serve different purposes.

A tagline is a short line or a phrase about the company’s brand essence. It is all about what the company stands for and promises. An example for a hair salon might be “Styling that’s always in style.” It rarely changes unless the company itself undergoes a major transformation.

Slogans are specifically for advertising and promotional campaigns. For instance, a retailer might have a slogan for their back to school sale as “Educate yourself about our savings.” Slogans may change regularly to match the latest offerings.

 

Taglines In More Detail

A tagline positions the company in the minds of potential customers. It differentiates the enterprise from competitors. All branding activities flow from what the tagline says.

Brevity is favoured. Seven words or less is the preferred length. That way it can be easily remembered. Also it can fit on everything from business cards to your website and social media properties.

Think of the tagline as your reason for being in business. As well you can view it as the written counterpart to your company logo.

 

More About Slogans

Does your firm engage in seasonal advertising or varied campaigns for products and services? The slogan for each of these is the promotional battlecry. You’re telling customers why they should buy from you NOW.

A slogan should reinforce the promise of your tagline. So if you position yourselves as building the best built outdoor decks, don’t cheapen that with a chintzy slogan. But if you’re the lowest price competitor, feel free to go crazy like so many small car dealers and appliance retailers do.

Another way slogans are used is to differentiate products or services. Do you offer just one product or service in different lines to targeted customers? The high-end line might have a loftier slogan than the bargain versions. If you sell a variety of product or service types, say plumbing repair and fixtures too, each of those could have its own slogan.

 

Types of Taglines and Slogans

There’s a range of categories into which taglines and slogans fall. Short or longer. Funny or serious. Realistic or aspirational. Here’s a brief look at some of the popular types.

Humorous. Getting customers to chuckle is a tried and true method of connecting. Funny is good when it breaks through the clutter and makes people feel good about your company. Avoid humour if it might be offensive or readily misinterpreted.

Negative. Sometimes you have no choice but to turn lemons into lemonade. A jelly and jam maker with an awkward company name claimed “With a name like ours, we have to taste good.” On the flip side, a cough syrup maker has bragged “Tastes awful, works great.”

Realistic. If you have a unique attribute that beats the competition, consider boasting about it. “You won’t find lower prices anywhere.” Or “The only one with a full money back guarantee.” Ensure the statement is true – and continues to be so – or risk being charged with false advertising.

 

Create Them Yourself Or Contract Out?

Some small business people like the challenge of developing mottos themselves. Others don’t have time or aren’t adept with words.

Outsourcing the process can be done inexpensively. This works well if you don’t need carefully tailored or trademarkable results. Check out the freelance talent marketplace sites. For anywhere from $5 to $50 you can get a usable tagline or slogan.

If you have questions regarding customized versions, logos, branding and more, visit our digital agency bythefoundry.com. They will be happy to guide you and offer you the best solutions for your business.