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Revamp recruitment with ultra-targeted social ads

Revamp recruitment with ultra-targeted social ads

Recruiting candidates for new positions at your organization can be exciting. It means that you’re adding new and promising talent to your pool of existing employees. It might also mean that you’re growing to meet client demands and that your profits are growing, too.

 

But recruiting can also be frustrating. It can be a drain on your organization’s resources, using up time and money that you’d all rather be spending elsewhere.

 

Sometimes you have to look hard to find the best people. So you broadcast your openings on multiple different platforms and are deluged with responses. And often the best candidates aren’t even engaged in an active job search. How are they going to see your opportunities if they’re not looking?

 

The answer: Social media.

 

What’s your social strategy?

If you’re reading this in 2015, no doubt you’re already using social media in some way, shape or form as part of your recruitment strategy. But are you using it as effectively as possible?

 

Twitter has proven to be one of the most powerful social media recruitment tools out there. A 2011 survey found that nearly 8 million people found their job through Twitter and that 40% of all job seekers have used the platform as part of their job hunt. Since then, Twitter’s active user base has tripled, from 100 million to more than 300 million active users, and that’s had a huge impact on the way people look for work.

 

Now take into account the 35 million Tweets mentioning keywords related to job searches last year alone, and the average of 60,000 jobs Tweeted out every day, according to Twitter. You can see why the little birdy has such a strong song.

 

Twitter then: Reach was way too narrow or much too wide

Until now, organizations looking for new talent have used Twitter largely in one of two ways. They either Tweet out job openings from their corporate Twitter account and ask their employees and other friends to reTweet in order to reach a wider audience. Or they use Twitter’s ad platform to blast their recruiting news out to the public, based on relatively simple criteria, such as location, keyword usage and demographics.

 

The first strategy means that only your followers and those of your obliging employees and friends see your announcement. And the second strategy requires a lot more work on your part, unless you’re a social media guru. It means that your job openings show up in the feeds of countless people who aren’t right for the position.

 

But now there’s a better way. It’s called Monster Social Job Ads, and it’s guaranteed to reduce your workload and yield fewer but better candidates. Here’s how.

 

Twitter now:  Layered data allows for precise targeting

We partner with Twitter to use their client data with our Monster Social Job Ads. Then we layer on our rich candidate data, sourced from Monster’s extensive resume and social profile database.

 

With this double dose of data, an employer looking to find, for example, a dental hygienist in White Rock, B.C., will be able to target candidates who likely work or have likely have worked in that field, in that region. The employer’s ad is Tweeted to this targeted audience for 30 days or until 50 engagements (or clicks on Twitter) have occurred. Engagements include favourites, clicking the apply start button and other click engagements such as user profile clicks.

 

To make this even more of a no-brainer, after the initial implementation the process is fully automated as an extension of a Monster job ad, so you don’t need to be a social advertising expert to participate. With little more than the click of a mouse, recruiters become sophisticated social marketers and qualified job applications start coming in.

 

Your organization deserves great employees, and employees deserve great job opportunities. With Monster Social Job Ads, both of those things can happen, and everyone wins.